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Landlords have not taken ‘fair share of the discomfort’ on leas– dining establishments

Landlords have not taken ‘fair share of the discomfort’ on leas– dining establishments
Landlords renting commercial premises have not stepped up to the plate and taken their “fair share of the pain” during the coronavirus pandemic, the Restaurants Association of Ireland (RAI) has told the Oireachtas Covid-19 committee. Landlords of restaurants and other small businesses were demanding full payment of rent at pre-coronavirus levels, despite premises being closed…

Landlords renting commercial properties have actually not stepped up to the plate and taken their “reasonable share of the discomfort” during the coronavirus pandemic, the Restaurants Association of Ireland(RAI) has told the Oireachtas Covid-19 committee.

Landlords of dining establishments and other small businesses were demanding complete payment of rent at pre-coronavirus levels, regardless of properties being closed for several months, RAI chief executive Adrian Cummins stated.

Restaurants had actually seen little or no payment from insurance companies for organisation disruption cover over the national lockdown, no haircut on rents, and sometimes energy companies had actually detached properties, Mr Cummins said.

” A great deal of people will need to close their doors due to the fact that the landlords are not playing ball,” he said.

The Covid-19 committee was speaking with agents from the hospitality sector, vintners, and the events industry on Tuesday.

” We want the exact same securities that residential tenants have for commercial occupants,” Mr Cummins told the committee. “Landlords have actually not stepped up to the plate to take their fair share of the discomfort that all organisations are suffering at the moment,” he stated.

” We need some sort of burden sharing for the property managers where everyone has to take a cut: banks, landlords,” he stated.

The State required to establish a forum to bring all celebrations to the table to prevent a “tsunami” of service closures, he stated.

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Sinn Féin TD David Cullinane stated it was clear that attracting the “goodwill of proprietors” to unwind rent payments was not working.

If the hospitality sector did not receive substantial assistance in the Government’s organized financial July stimulus, and in other measures such as a decrease in VAT, half of all restaurants would be forced to close, Mr Cummins claimed.

Padraig Cribben, president of the Vintners’ Federation of Ireland, which represents clubs beyond Dublin, stated he was “perplexed” that some clubs might reopen if they served food.

Clubs can reopen if they can run as restaurants and serve a substantial meal costing around EUR9, while the remainder of the sector must wait till July 20 th to resume.

Mr Cribben stated all bars need to “have been permitted open on the one day,” with particular public health standards in location. “It baffles us how having a meal makes something more secure than not eating,” he said.

Green Celebration TD Steven Matthews stated there was a “huge onus” on bars to manage physical distancing and time frame for clients. He questioned if bars would be accountable if a break out of coronavirus was linked to the facilities.

Mr Cribben said bars restoring their insurance policies had actually been made aware “you’re on your own” if someone took a claim against them over a coronavirus outbreak.

Tim Fenn, chief executive of the Irish Hotels Federation, stated 180,000 of the 270,000 tasks supported by the tourism sector were “at danger” in the fallout from the pandemic.

The sector required a reduction in VAT to 5 per cent till the end of next year, and for the short-term wage aid scheme to stay while social distancing requirements were in place, he said.

Mr Fenn included the wage aid scheme was “manifestly unfair” as it did not support hotels which operated on a seasonal basis.

The effect of the coronavirus crisis on the arts and occasions industry had been “unprecedented and terrible” Elaine O’Connor, co-founder of the Occasion Industry Association of Ireland, informed the committee.

Federal government funding supplied to Fáilte Ireland and the Arts Council “would not filter down” to artists and employees in the events market, she said.

Shane Dunne, deputy chairman of the Occasion Production Market Covid-19 Working Group, said the sector “has actually lost an entire year’s worth of turnover,” and had no roadmap from the Federal government for how it would recuperate.

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